Who are the main players in the Game of Thrones after AFFC/ADWD? (Part 2)

Alrighty. Let’s do this!

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Part 1 is here for those playing along at home…

Who else remains as a core, important character or plot as at the end of AFFC/ADWD?

SPOILER ALERT: I do refer to S6E1 in this post, so if you’re planning to remain completely unsullied…. don’t read.

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Gender in Westeros: Moon Tea

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This gorgeous piece showing a teenage Lysa, Cat and Baelish came from here 

One of the things that’s awesome about GRRM’s work is that, although he’s an older bloke, he does a pretty good job of deconstructing and accurately representing the experiences of women living in a misogynistic society.

This comes up in lots of different ways, but one of the big ones is the knowledge (or lack thereof) of contraceptives and ways to overcome the expectation of noble women that they’re nothing more than brood mares for the noble MALE lines of Westeros.

I do plan to do a lot more essays/rants about gender issues in ASOIAF, but for now I want to focus on two things that were revealed in ASOS/AFFC that I thought were really obvious but, based on the surprise of various redditors on /r/asoiaf whenever these two things come up, were apparently not that obvious. Maybe it’s like Jenny dying of AIDS in Forrest Gump, which isn’t explicitly stated but is pretty obvious – but apparently not to many.

These two cases involve the use of “moon tea” – Westeros’ version of a herbal abortifacient. Firstly by Jeyne Westerling, forced upon her by her mother, and then the case of Lysa Tully Arryn, forced upon her by her father. The connecting factor is Catelyn Tully Stark: Cat doesn’t seem to know anything about moon tea or any other birth control, because she doesn’t pick up on either incident. Apparently because Cat doesn’t figure it out (in Lysa’s case, until way too late) many readers don’t pick it up either.

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Mothers in ASOIAF 1: Cersei & Catelyn

Mothers in A Song of Ice and Fire range from the overly loving to the point of smothering Lysa Tully Arryn, to the total narcissism of Cersei Lannister.

According to the Faith (itself representative of medieval Catholicism) and the medieval style gender-based roles for society, being a mother is the sole purpose of noble ladies. Breed and get out those heirs and spares, and raise them to be great lords and supple brides for other lords.

But what can we see in various mothers in ASOIAF? I might come back to this line of analysis in the future, but for now, have some thoughts on Cersei and Catelyn. Cersei’s is truncated a bit as I later adapted some of this for a more complex and nuanced analysis of Cersei herself, so bear with it…

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Sansa: Ned’s naive daughter

This is something I posted on /r/asoiaf way back when… now that I’ve made a blog to consolidate all my ASOIAF theories, I’ve copied, pasted and updated it. 

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A while back I had one of those lightning bolt moments where you realise something really obvious.

Fans have all commented endlessly about Ned and Sansa’s individual naivety and romanticism in how they view the world.

I guess I had always done what Westeros did – lumped Sansa in with her mother, because she looked and acted like the perfect Southron lady, with her Faith in the Seven and perfect manners for court, her Southron hair styles and enthusiasm for King’s Landing.

But…

Sansa really is Ned’s daughter. She might not have the same hair, same look, follow the same gods but she has the same stupidly naive world view.

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